I had wanted to travel to Kiev for a long time. Finally, I was able to make this trip in a way that combined business and pleasure.

I have to admit that I was not too enamored of the capital. It turned out that Deribasovska str. Is better than Khreschatik, in my opinion! But, the QA Fest was very interesting and I enjoyed it very much.

There was a minimum promotion of IT schools, and the promoters provided a maximum amount of required information. The seminars were interesting for junior QA engineers as well as for trainees.

The seminars were conducted in 2 halls. In Hall A the specialists shared basic topics that would be of interest to beginners. I spent the entire day in Hall B. The seminars in Hall B focused more on automation than did those in the other Hall, which is why I chose it.

A few leading companies had booths, which were located in the lobby. Companies such as SIGMA, CIKLUM, and Itera were present. I took a look at a few of these booths and tried one of Itera’s funny prototypes on myself. I tried to move things mentally. And it happened! Five games – three wins!

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The conference featured many charismatic presenters with excellent lectures – plenty of information given in a light atmsophere. One of the lecturers, a Norwegian named Per Thorsheim, took selfies with a few of his audience. He shared information about web security. He used a small number of free & online tools such as: internet.nl, www.ssllabs.com, checktls.com, securityheaders.io, content security policy plugin and showed how to check the security & privacy of websites before signing up for anything from them.

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Another lecturer, Romanian Claudiu Draghia gave a presentation on the topic “Review Requirements.” It was interactive and full of useful information and techniques that people would be able to start to use immediately. Claudiu answered these questions:
What are the requirements for designing a client’s website?
How should you receive the requirements from your clients?
What can you do to better remember the requirements?
How can you move from knowing to understanding requirements?
When do you know you have understood the requirements?
What is the impact of good or bad requirements?
He showed and explained his topic with pictures and puppets?

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One of the lectures was given by a senior automation QA engineer from Ciklum, Sergey Pirogov, who developed a library for the JAVA “java video recorder”. This library is for recording and saving video after testing. A very useful program in some cases.

Yakov Kramarenko, CEO of Automation, showed examples of how Implicit & Explicit Waits works.

Anton Serputko showed examples of how to start auto tests with Jenkins CI. And he covered a bit about Selenium Grid, mainly about it cons!

I also liked the talk given by Alexandr Nedelyaev. He told about browser helpers for QA engineers, such as Wave, NoCoffee (vision simulator), Performance Analyzer, Exploratory Testing by Microsoft, Nimbus (for print screens), Autofill (automation of fill form)s, Page Ruler, Profit Pixel (for the difference between the sketch and site), View Port, etc.

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I would like to implement a few of these features in my future work, beginning immediately. It was really helpful for me to understand a lot of major elements in the QA area.

Next year I want to return to this conference on the main day. The QA Fest was nice for meeting and learning from experienced specialists, and making new friends in the Dark Side of the IT sphere!